My kiln-formed glass bowls, shields, sculptures, and roll-ups explore the subtle colours and delicate beauty of naturally occurring textures and encourage the viewer to ponder their origin.

Textures are a key part of our everyday visual landscape and through them we interpret how objects were formed, or how they evolved. Although textures may have common forms, their origin and evolution might be very different. For example, mud cracks in rocks and the wrinkled skin of the elderly look the same but are formed by entirely different processes. So by recognizing and interpreting textures we can understand and appreciate the stories of how objects and people evolve.

Stories have different interpretations depending on the timing and vantage points of our observations. I have tried to capture this sense of reference by presenting varying degrees of detail in my glass, from veining and blends of colours, to the use of delicate visual components. Thus, my pieces reveal one set of details when viewed from a distance and another set of details that are apparent only when viewed up close.